I.2.1. The Philosophical-Sociological Understanding of Luxury

 

The proponents of a philosophical-sociological understanding of luxury concentrate mainly on the evolution of attitudes towards luxury and its societal benefits (e.g. Berry 1994; Mandeville 1724; Sombart 1922, p. 86 et seqq.) and on the changes in the appearance of luxury and preferences for luxury (e.g. Dohrn-van Rossum 2002; Fuehrer 2008, p. 185 et seqq.; Koschel 2005 and Reitzle 2001, p. 26 et seqq.).

 

The Philosophic-Sociological Understanding of Luxury

The Philosophic-Sociological Understanding of Luxury

 

This understanding represents the broadest scope of luxury that can be referred to as luxuries or luxury resources. Examples include musical talent, time, and true love (see also Sombart 1922, p. 85). Luxuries are defined as follows:

Luxuries correspond to the philosophical-sociological understanding and the broadest scope of luxury, comprising all resources which are desirable and exceed what is necessary and ordinary.

 

Exampels of Luxuries

Exampels of Luxuries